All posts by Graham Hassall. Browse Other Authors

Graham Hassall

In his professional life Graham has specialised in the study of government and public policy in the Pacific Islands and has additional interests in global studies. He has taught at universities in Australia, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, and New Zealand, and now resides on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. Graham has published on Baha'i history and biography in the Journal of Religious History, the Journal of Baha'i Studies, Baha'i Studies Review, numerous Baha'i Studies conference proceedings, The Baha'i World, the Baha'i Encyclopedia, and elsewhere.

A Tribute to Ethel Dawe

Early Australian Baha'i Ethel Dawe (1902-1954) Photo courtesy of the the Australian National Baha'i Archives.

The first generation of Australian and New Zealand Baha’is included a number of extremely capable women, who excelled at sharing the teachings of the Baha’i Faith through public speaking and writing, and who also learnt about the administration of the Baha’i Faith by serving on and establishing Spiritual Assemblies and committees, from local to national levels. They included Hilda Brooks, Margaret Dixson, Emily Axford, Maysie Almond, Dulcie Dive, Thelma Perks, and Gretta Lamprill. In celebration of the centenary of the Baha’i Faith in Australia, this essay reviews the life of yet another of these early heroines, Ethel Dawe.

Ms Dawe was born in Kadina, South Australia on October 17, 1902. She was educated at the Methodist Ladies College, was an accomplished pianist and singer, and her recitations, as well as her participation in Adelaide society, was regularly mentioned in the newspapers’ social columns. In 1931 Ethel heard of the Baha’i teachings from her mother’s aunt, Maysie Almond – who together with her husband Perce had been the first South Australians to accept the Baha’i Faith after hearing Hyde Dunn speak in Adelaide in 1924. Continue reading