Tag Archives Baha’i children’s book

Micky’s Masterpiece – A New Children’s Book About Art by Anne Gordon Perry

Anne Gordon Perry is a radiant artist, bright and brimming with creative projects. We interviewed her on the Baha’i Blogcast to talk about her film Luminous Journey (you can find that episode here) and in this interview she tells us all about her children’s book called Micky’s Masterpiece.

Here’s what Anne shared with us:

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I have been committed to the arts for over five decades, particularly since becoming a Baha’i, and my passion for creativity relates to many things I do. I teach college writing, film appreciation, art appreciation, and humanities at the Art Institute of Dallas and have a PhD in Aesthetic Studies. As an artist, I write and do some theatre, dance, visual art, and filmmaking. My interest in children’s literature comes out of my love for stories, for storytelling, and for contributing something to the education of young people.

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Abdu’l-Baha’s Little Brown Cat – A Children’s Book by Carolyn Sparey Fox

I’ve gotten to know Carolyn Sparey Fox through our interviews for Baha’i Blog. Several years ago, she told us about her book The Half of It Was Never Told and then she shared with us some details regarding her book about the German Templars (Seeking a State of Heaven).

It’s a delight to hear from Carolyn again and this time it’s about a children’s book called Abdu’l-Baha’s Little Brown Cat, written in honor of the centenary of His Passing. Here’s what Carolyn graciously shared with us:

Baha’i Blog: Could you please tell us a little about your book?

Abdu’l-Baha’s Little Brown Cat is an illustrated story book for children of all ages, and for adults who like to read to them. It was written in commemoration of the centenary of the passing of Abdu’l-Baha in November 1921, and tells the story of His last years through the eyes and ears of His little brown cat.

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Remembering Abdu’l-Baha – A Debut Children’s Book by Shira Trick

Shira Trick is an all-round magical person, but especially with children. It is a delight to interview her about her book about Abdu’l-Baha for children called Remembering Abdu’l-Baha.

In this Baha’i Blog post, Shira tells us a little bit about her book, what inspired her to write (and illustrate!) it, and what she’s learned along the way.

Here’s what she shared with us:

Baha’i Blog: Can you please tell us a little about yourself?

My name, Shira, means poem or song in Hebrew and somehow this has always felt fitting given how much I love to write and how much I enjoy singing and finding meaning in the lyrics of songs. I was born in Haifa and later served there myself for a little over a decade. It was the beginning of my story as well as the beginning of my children’s stories and holds great significance in our lives. My family left Israel when I was 3 months old though, so I didn’t grow up there, I grew up in Juneau, Alaska, and even though I haven’t lived there since I was 15, it is still my heart’s home. It shaped the beauty my heart responds to – as you can see in the picture on the front of my book. Mountains, snow, trees, water, these pieces of God’s creation have a deep connection to the story of my heart.

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The Winter Cloak – A Novel for Children About Abdu’l-Baha

The Winter Cloak is a short novel for young readers by Ronald (Ron) Tomanio. It tells the fictional story of an impoverished ten year old named Ahmed who meets Abdu’l-Baha in November 1921, who is given a cloak by Him, and who becomes one of the many who mourn His Passing.

Although a work of fiction, Ron draws on historical texts to bring his story to life and to give young readers a sense of what it would have been like 100 years ago, to lament and grieve the loss of Abdu’l-Baha.

Ron graciously agreed to tell us about his book. Here’s what he shared with the Baha’i Blog team:

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I’m 74 years old, married for 40 years to a wonderful woman named Karen. We have two daughters and five grandchildren who are all Baha’is. Karen and I live in the shadow of Green Acre a few miles away in Eliot, Maine (USA). I became a Baha’i at Green Acre when I was 17. My early teachers were Stanwood Cobb and Curtis Kelsey. Both men knew Abdu’l-Baha and all they wanted to talk about was Him, which was fine with me. I wrote my first children’s book 27 years ago. It was called Lilly & Peggy for George Ronald. I write mostly books for children, but did co-author With Thine Own Eyes: Why Imitate When You Can Investigate Reality? for George Ronald. This is a book I didn’t want to write because it diverted my focus from writing books for children.

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Alvin: The Green Acre Water Boy

Ronald Tomanio has penned a new children’s book relating to Abdu’l-Baha called Alvin – The Green Acre Water Boy.

Based on a true story, the book asks its readers the questions: What would you have done if you met Abdu’l-Baha on a hot August afternoon at Green Acre? Would you have offered Him a ladle of cool spring water? What would you have said to Him? What would He have said to you?

Ron graciously agreed to tell us about his book and here’s what he shared with us:

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I’m 74 years old, married for 40 years to a wonderful woman named Karen. We have two daughters and five grandchildren who are all Baha’is. Karen and I live in the shadow of Green Acre a few miles away in Eliot, Maine (USA). I became a Baha’i at Green Acre when I was 17. My early teachers were Stanwood Cobb and Curtis Kelsey. Both men knew Abdu’l-Baha and all they wanted to talk about was Him, which was fine with me. I wrote my first children’s book 27 years ago. It was called Lilly & Peggy for George Ronald. I write mostly books for children, but did co-author With Thine Own: Why Imitate When You Can Investigate Reality? for George Ronald. This is a book I didn’t want to write because it diverted my focus from writing books for children.

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Two New Books to Nurture Love for Abdu’l-Baha in Children’s Hearts

Celeste Finn has created two children’s books about Abdu’l-Baha. While they would be valuable resources any year, they are particularly precious this year as we reflect profoundly on the Life of Abdu’l-Baha and as we share stories about Him with the children in our lives in honor of the centenary anniversary of His Passing.

Celeste kindheartedly agreed to tell us about her two books, and to provide a little sneak peak of one of them. We hope you enjoy our conversation and that the sample story at the bottom whets your appetite to read more! Continue reading

Signs of God’s Love – A New Children’s Book by Tahirih Lemon

Tahirih Lemon has penned a new book for children called Signs of God’s Love and, to judge a book by its cover, it looks delightful! Illustrated by Lusya Stetskovych, this book introduces the concept of God, the loving Creator, and what makes humans special.

It was lovely to interview Tahirih Lemon about her book series for junior youth called The Independent Investigator (you can find that interview here on Baha’i Blog) and I was thrilled to hear from her about this new publication:

Baha’i Blog: Could you please tell us a little about your book Signs of God’s Love?

Signs of God’s Love is a story about a boy named Aidan, who learns about the signs of God’s love throughout creation, while hiking with his father. As Aidan wonders and ponders, his father teaches him about the unique power each form of creation possesses. It is a beautifully illustrated book introducing the concept of God, the loving Creator, and what makes humans special.

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Meet Coach Ben – A New Comic Book Series for Kids

Written by Munib Rezaie, an educator and school counselor living in the United States, Meet Coach Ben is the first instalment in a brand new series of children’s books that feature a diverse cast, positive models of masculinity, and practical parenting advice, all rendered in beautiful hand-drawn comic book style illustrations.

I got in touch with Munib to find out more about the book and the initiative as a whole. Here’s what he shared: Continue reading

We Are One — A New Children’s Book by Melissa Charepoo

Our family loves Melissa Charepoo’s books and her latest title, We Are One, is a gem. Centred on the theme of the oneness of humanity, this book (available in both English and Spanish) will help instil in the hearts of even the youngest children this unifying fundamental principle of the Baha’i Faith.

Melissa, gracious as ever, agreed to tell us a little about this book. We hope you enjoy our conversation:

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us about what inspired you to write this book and how it differs from the other wonderful books for children that you’ve written? Why was writing this book important and meaningful to you?

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Together, Even When We’re Apart – A Children’s Book About Serving Others & the Pandemic

I interviewed the dynamic duo, writer Linda Ahdieh Grant and illustrator Anna Myers, previously on Baha’i Blog about their children’s book I Love My Name (you can read the interview here). Arising to meet the needs of our age, they have partnered up again to create a children’s story book called Together, Even When We’re Apart. Its subtitle is “My Neighborhood’s Stories of the COVID-19 Pandemic”, which offers us a glimpse of what to expect in its pages.

Linda and Anna graciously agreed to tell us about their latest project, how it came together, and what they hope it will offer children and their families. Here’s what they said:

Baha’i Blog: What inspired you to write this book?

We initially got the idea to write a book about COVID-19 in the spring of 2020 in response to a contest announcement to create a children’s book to help explain COVID-19 to children. By the time we found out that we didn’t win the contest, we were super excited about the endeavor and decided to move forward with it anyway. 

Throughout the time that we were working on the project, Anna and I were experiencing the pandemic first-hand together with our families and our neighbors and, like people all over the world, we were having all kinds of conversations – about how to keep everyone safe, about how to help others, and about what would happen next. Both Anna and I felt really fortunate that during this time, the Universal House of Justice wrote several amazing letters to Baha’is all around the world to assure us of prayers, to share encouragement and love, and to give guidance about how the Baha’i community was responding and could further respond. We found the themes and concepts of these letters to be tremendously comforting and also clarifying — themes about hopefulness, about service to others, about manifesting unity and solidarity in action, about the cultivation of spiritual qualities needed during a crisis, about bending our minds to the needs of our communities, and about how the pandemic could give us insight and appreciation of our inherent oneness and interdependence. Continue reading