Tag Archives Baha’i publication

Crimson Ink – A Novel of Modern Iran by Gail Madjzoub

In my interviews with authors for Baha’i Blog, I have noticed a quiet flourishing of Baha’i-inspired novels and they range widely in their genres and styles. Gail Madjzoub has penned a novel titled Crimson Ink which features the workings, struggles and hopes of three families — some Baha’is and others Muslim — in near-contemporary Iran. Curious to know more, I reached out and am grateful Gail responded. Here’s what she shared with me:

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Although I was brought up near Boston, Massachusetts, I lived and worked most of my life in Europe and Africa, and traveled widely. I’m currently on the West Coast of Canada close to family.

My professional background has been in education, coaching, and healthcare and I’ve drawn on these a great deal in Crimson Ink.

I have a “Persian connection” through my first husband. I was immersed in a marvelous Persian family and its rich history for the 20 years before his death. Before, during and after the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran, we kept a close watch on the renewed persecution of the Persian Baha’is, and their situation struck a particular chord in me.

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A Seed in Your Heart: A New Book About Louise Mathew Gregory

A Seed in Your Heart is a new biography of the life of Louise Mathew Gregory. You may have heard of her before: she married Louis Gregory at Abdu’l-Baha’s suggestion, resulting in the first inter-racial Baha’i marriage of its kind. Janet Fleming Rose is its author and I was very interested to hear more about her book, and to learn a little about Louise Gregory and her stellar accomplishments and services to the Baha’i Faith. Here’s my conversation with Janet. I hope you find it as enlightening as I did!

Baha’i Blog: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

I was born in Surrey in the south of England, but have lived in various parts of the world: Scotland, Fiji, Maldives, Spain and more recently Israel where I had the privilege of serving for six years at the Baha’i World Centre as Acquisitions Librarian.

I’ve always had a love of books and the ambition to have a book published. I studied modern languages at the University of Edinburgh and trained as a professional librarian. My hobbies and interests include travelling the world, a love of history, a passion for wild flowers, birding, rambling, learning other languages, an interest in other cultures and singing along to Classic FM radio.

For the last 12 years I’ve lived with my husband, Andrew, in St Albans, an ancient Roman city and burial place of the first English Christian martyr, St Alban.

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“Framework for Action” – New Collection of Letters from the Universal House of Justice

Palabra Publications has released a new collection of selected messages from the Universal House of Justice from 2006 to 2016. Having access to successive years of recent guidance in a single book is a great study and reference tool and we’re excited to share the news of this volume’s publication with you.

Palabra has summarized the contents of this collection with these words:

“In 2006, at the end of the first of a series of four Five Year Plans, only the first glimmerings of an intensive program of growth had emerged, and a new pattern of action was consolidated in but a few score clusters. The first elements of an evolving framework for action had just emerged, which, in the past decade, has been more fully understood, elaborated, and exploited. Among the many important concepts and practices that received attention over this period were the systematization of cycles of growth, the learning mode, the functioning of the Auxiliary Boards, the training institute as an educational process with three distinct stages, institutional capacity at the cluster and regional levels, the movement of youth, accompaniment, a coherent life of service, social action, involvement in the discourses of society, and universal participation. The movement of clusters along a developmental path marked by a series of milestones has now become well understood, such that some two hundred clusters have been able to create a pattern of community life that embraces a thousand or thousands, while some five thousand additional clusters follow in this well-defined pattern of action.” Continue reading