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Steph G

After obtaining her doctorate in astrophysics in England, Steph moved with her husband to Munich where she spends her days working in data science. In her spare time, she is a bit of a bookworm, enjoys being creative (e.g. through art or music), loves being outside in the beautiful nature of Southern Germany, practises yoga, and strives to create within her neighbourhood a community that feels like home. She is inspired by the Baha'i Writings, as well as those of other religions in the one eternal faith of God. The thing she feels most grateful for in the Faith she discovered about a decade ago is the sense of hope which it gives in a world seemingly broken by disunity. Believing that Baha'u'llah's vision of a peaceful and unified world is not only possible, but inevitable, is what spurs her on to try and contribute her part.

How Bullet Journalling Helps Me Be a More Consistent & Systematic Baha’i

Baha’is all over the world are striving to systematize their efforts and to be methodical about their endeavours to “effect a transformation in the whole character of mankind, a transformation that shall manifest itself both outwardly and inwardly”. We are given Plans by the Universal House of Justice and are encouraged to think in quarterly cycles of action, reflection, and planning. On the personal level, Baha’u’llah tells us to “bring [ourselves] to account each day”, to strive to “let each morn be better than its eve and each morrow richer than its yesterday”, and Abdu’l-Baha encourages us to “be constant in offering [daily] obligatory prayer”. The theme of systematic action has also been further explored here on Baha’i Blog.

Bullet journaling has helped me to be reliable, methodical and systematic both in my personal devotions, as well as in my service to the world at large; it has helped me create my personal plans and be organized in my efforts and participation in community building initiatives. Of course, bullet journaling isn’t the only way to be systematic on a personal level, but I’d like to share my personal experience here in the hope that others might find something useful in it.  Continue reading

4 Things to Help You Develop Your Relationship with God

4 Things to help you Develop Your Relationship with GodIt recently struck me that becoming more spiritual requires both effort and volition, that it isn’t something that will just happen unless I do my part for it. This realisation came while I was reflecting on the following quote from Baha’u’llah:

Love Me, that I may love thee. If thou lovest Me not, My love can in no wise reach thee.

I realised that I needed to focus more on the first part of the quote, “Love Me…”, which I had previously almost overlooked. Many of us know that at times this command requires effort, and at other times it can seem like the most natural thing in the world. However, at least for me, loving God is not always something that comes easily, and I have to consciously remind myself of it ever so often, so here are four ways.
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Can You Solve This?

Everyone has the right to education”, says article 26 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Unfortunately, the reality is very different: many young people in Iran today are being denied this right. They might have gotten the grades to pursue higher education – they might even be among the top students in the country. Yet, when they submit their application forms, they are told that their files are incomplete, that they do not fulfil the necessary entry requirements; in short: that they cannot attend higher education.

The reason why they are denied this basic human right, in spite of their academic ability, is that they are members of political opposition groups, human rights or women’s rights activists or members of religious minorities, such as the Bahá’ís. In the case of the Bahá’ís, even the community’s attempt to educate their youth by setting up the Bahá’í Institute for Higher Education (BIHE) has been criminalised, and many of the educators supporting the project have been imprisoned.

The world, however, is not going to simply watch as many young people’s dreams of serving society are being destroyed, with the mere education of many young people being declared a crime in Iran. Continue reading