All posts by Naysan Naraqi. Browse Other Authors

Naysan is the editor of Baha'i Blog and he has worked in various avenues of media for two decades. He’s passionate about using the arts and media to support and explore the teachings of the Baha’i Faith and he has produced and collaborated on popular music projects like the "DawnBreaker Collective" and the successful Ruhi-inspired sequence of "MANA" albums. His experience as a producer for CNN was invaluable while working on a number of special projects for the Baha’i World Centre, including the "Building Momentum" and "Pilgrimage: A Sacred Experience" videos. If there’s a media-related Baha’i project out there, chances are that Naysan was involved with it somehow!

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Creating a Space to Celebrate the Indigenous Peoples of Australia

The 2021 National NAIDOC logo ‘Care for Country’ was designed by Gubbi Gubbi artist Maggie-Jean Douglas.

This week across Australia, we celebrate what’s called NAIDOC Week, a week where every year in July, Australians from all walks of life celebrate and honor the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Now, I’m not an Aboriginal or a Torres Strait Islander myself. I moved to Australia about 12 years ago and decided to make it my home and apply for Australian citizenship. I recently sat my Australian citizenship test, which presented a few interesting questions relating to the Indigenous peoples of this land. The test really got me thinking about the First Nations peoples of Australia, and how, after living in Australia for over a decade, my knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures — I’m embarrassed to say — still remains extremely limited. Sure, I could say that I’ve watched movies like Rabbit Proof Fence, and that “I have some Aboriginal friends,” but honestly, other than a few facts here and there, I know absolutely nothing about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. I guess with NAIDOC Week happening, and because of my Australian Citizenship test, it really hit me: I love this country and want to be a contributing member of its society, but how can I truly call Australia my home when I know so little about the original inhabitants of this land? Continue reading

NAIDOC Week: Baha’i Blog Interviews Marjorie Reid

In this Baha’i Blog interview in honour of NAIDOC Week, Naysan speaks with Marjorie Reid, an Aboriginal Australian of the Wulli Wulli people who come from the Auburn Hawkwood area of Queensland.

NAIDOC Week is a national week of celebrations held across Australia every year, in order to honour the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Continue reading

NAIDOC Week: Baha’i Blog Interviews Marjorie Reid [Audio Version]

This is the audio version of Baha’i Blog’s interview in honour of NAIDOC Week, where Naysan speaks with Marjorie Reid, an Aboriginal Australian of the Wulli Wulli people who come from the Auburn Hawkwood area of Queensland.

You can watch the video of the interview here: NAIDOC Week: Baha’i Blog Interviews Marjorie Reid

NAIDOC Week is a national week of celebrations held across Australia every year, in order to honour the history, culture and achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Continue reading

“Blessed is the Spot” by Dominique Sylvester [Audio Track]

Baha’i Blog Studio Sessions is an initiative where we invite Baha’is and their friends from around the world to come into a studio and share the Baha’i Writings put to music.

In this Baha’i Blog Studio Session, we’re in Johannesburg, South Africa with Dominique Sylvester who sings “Blessed is the Spot” from the Writings of Baha’u’llah. Continue reading

Baha’i Blogcast with Rainn Wilson – Episode 65: Angelina Diliberto Allen (In Honor of Abdu’l-Baha)

Hello and welcome to the Baha’i Blogcast with me your host, Rainn Wilson.

In this series of podcasts I interview members of the Baha’i Faith and friends from all over the world about their hearts, and minds, and souls, their spiritual journeys, what they’re interested in, and what makes them tick.

In this special episode in honor of the 100th Anniversary of the passing of Abdu’l-Baha, I’m joined by Baha’i author, Angelina Diliberto Allen. Angelina shares how her family became Baha’is, some pioneering experiences, and how being in a chewing-gum commercial helped her and her twin sister go on pilgrimage. We talk about what the House of Justice calls “this infinitely poignant moment”, and Angelina tells us some fascinating stories about the six Western Baha’is who were in the Holy Land at the time of Abdu’l-Baha’s passing. I’m sure you’ll enjoy this conversation as much I did! Continue reading

Hands of the Cause of God – Volume 4: Reflections on the Hands of the Cause

Hands of the Cause of God – Volume 4: Reflections on the Hands of the Cause is the fourth part of a four-part documentary series about The Hands of the Cause of God.

This outstanding four-part documentary series recounts the lives of the Hands of the Cause of God within the historical context of the Baha’i Faith. Told through first-person interviews and incredible never-before-seen archival footage, their incredible lives and service come to life in a powerful way, and which will inspire future generations. Continue reading

Are Humans Really Selfish?

This short video called “Are Humans Really Selfish?” is produced by the UK Baha’i Office of Public Affairs. It explores how western society is built on the assumption that humans are inherently selfish. Responses to Covid-19, however, have demonstrated our collective capacity to be selfless and altruistic. The video asks: Can we reconsider some of our fundamental beliefs at this unique moment? What is the best way to harness human potential? What would the world be like if it was understood that we all have an inherent capacity for altruism and self-sacrifice? Continue reading